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Introduction

Myths and Facts

ID

Due to the lack of information, there are common misconceptions surrounding sexual and reproductive health. We’re here to discuss some of them!

Click or tap on the cards below to view the facts!

F A C T

Multiple studies done by the World Health Organisation have shown that a comprehensive sex education programs do not increase sexual activity, in fact have shown that it help young people delay sexual initiation. For those who have already have had sex, these programs shows increase use of condoms and reduce frequency of sexual intercourse.

M Y T H

Sex education will encourage more youth to have sex.

F A C T

Not really! Sex is a personal thing and some might be overexaggerating too. Everyone is not having sex and you should never feel like you should if you’re not ready for it.

M Y T H

Everyone is having sex.

F A C T

This may be what your partner might be telling you. However, being in love with someone and being ready to have sex are two seperate things. Love is about communication, understanding and respect.

M Y T H

If you really loved him/her, you should have sex with them.

F A C T

The possibility of pregnancy is not fully eliminated when girls are having their period or even if it’s the first time. Pregnancy will occur if a sperm fertilizes an egg; an ejaculation will release around 250 millions sperm while it only takes one sperm to fertilize an egg. The best way to prevent pregnancy using contraception.

M Y T H

You can’t get pregnant if you are having sex on your period or if it’s your first time.

F A C T

Media might equate a bigger penis is better however, it truly depends on the couple and may be different for every individual. Sometimes penetration may not always be the only thing people like in bed.

M Y T H

A bigger penis is always better.

F A C T

The vagina is a muscle that will naturally soften and lengthen when a person is aroused to allow for easier insertion. If they are anxious or nervous, the walls of the vagina will contract, making it difficult for insertion. It does not have to do with the number of people a person have had sex with.

M Y T H

Vaginas that are loose shows the number of people a person have had sex with.

F A C T

When used properly condoms are also 98% effective in preventing STDs.

M Y T H

Condoms are only useful to prevent pregnancy.

F A C T

Many STDs are asymptomatic or do not present with signs or symptoms. It is important to practice safe sex and to be mindful about testing if sexually active.

M Y T H

I don’t have to worry because if I don’t feel sick, I don’t have an STD.

F A C T

There are multiple STDs that can spread through unprotected oral sex and anal sex.

M Y T H

We only do oral sex so we can’t get STDs.

F A C T

Although men who have sex with men, sex workers and injection drug users makes the most at risk to contracting HIV, anyone can get HIV. The virus does not discriminate.

M Y T H

HIV is a disease that affects only sex workers and homosexuals.

References

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